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Malibu Lagoon Virtual Tour

Photographed on October 23, 2015

Take a slideshow tour around the lagoon to see what may be in store for your visit.

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    The Kelp Canopy creates a majestic shaded entrance to the lagoon and serves as an outdoor classroom for students.
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    Students and visitors can sit and watch the wildlife up close as they enjoy their lunch.
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    Follow the path to the west to see the main channel of Malibu Creek as it flows into the Lagoon and the Pacific Ocean.
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    This is the overlook by PCH. Here you can see the dynamic connection between the Malibu Creek, the Lagoon and Pacific Ocean.
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    Perfect for morning photographs, the overlook by PCH offers spectacular views of nature and wildlife.
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    This is one of three islands that provide refuge for birds avoiding predators, like foxes, coyotes or feral cats.
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    Interpretive displays educate vistors about the Lagoon and the various wildlife that can be found their.
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    Picnic tables and seats line the north path.
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    Entering the lagoon on the west end you’ll find a 3 dimensional interactive model of the Malibu Creek Watershed that demonstrates how water flows through the watershed.
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    The amphitheater provides visitors and students the best view of the Lagoon.
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    From this vantage you can see how water circulates and is cleansed at the same time.
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    The “Winter Clock/Summer Ramp” measures the water level and tides using tiles to meaure the height. The path is submerged at high tides above 6.5 feet and the path is revealed as the tide lowers.
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    The bird blind allows visitors to hide and view wildlife without disturbing them.
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    This island is at the back of lagoon and in front of the bird blind. Many fish spawn back here and its a favorite feeding area for the raptures.
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    This interpretive display is located at the corner of the western and south paths.
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    The southern picnic area can accommodate large groups and is beside the famous Malibu Movie Colony.
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    The south path and road provides a surfer’s speedway to world famous Malibu Surfrider Beach.
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    The path to the beach teams with students, birders, sunbathers, and surfers enjoying the Lagoon and the beach.
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    At this junction point you can walk to the beach or the secluded Lagoon’s watershed overlook.
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    This interpretive display is at the watershed overlook where you can see the mountains as they descend into the lower watershed, where the creek meets the lagoon and surf-zone.
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    Birds enjoy the magnificent natural setting.
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    A Snowy Egret in flight.
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MISSION STATEMENT

Recover, restore and protect the lower Malibu Creek watershed and historical wetland in the heart of Malibu. Educate the general public about the wetland and riparian ecosystem, promote and restore clean and safe water for purposes of recreation, habitat and food sources.

VISION STATEMENT

Establish a thriving ecosystem in the lower Malibu Creek watershed that creates a green central park/open space area that protects adjacent properties from flooding, enhances water quality and habitat in the heart of Malibu.

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VOLUNTEER EVENT

Help restore Malibu Lagoon. Join California State Parks, The Bay Foundation and EcoMalibu to help maintain the newly restored Malibu Lagoon. Volunteers are needed to help control invasive weeds and to allow the recently planted native vegetation a chance to flourish. A large part of the lagoon restoration project is to dramatically increase the diversity of native plants. Please help the native plants take root.
Malibu Lagoon volunteer dates through to the end of 2016:

FROM 10:00 AM TO 1 PM

Saturday December 17

Go to the Bay Foundation Volunteer Contact Form >CLICK HERE< to sign up.

 

VIDEOS

Watch the evolution of the Malibu Lagoon’s recovery and restoration. Click on the image to go to the video page.

PHOTO SLIDESHOW GALLERY

Click on an image to see that photo slideshow.

Dance of the striped mullet- Photos taken 05-19-14 Striped mullet leaping out of the water at Malibu Lagoon are captured during a 30 minute time span. Striped Mullet can often be seen jumping in a dance to avoid predators as they are a common prey for other fish and birds. We hope you enjoy the Dance of the striped mullet. (Click on the image to the left to see the slideshow.)
Oscar the Osprey – Photos taken 4/4/14 Oscar is the Malibu Lagoon’s resident Osprey. In this series of images you’ll see Oscar hunt for prey around the perimeter of the lagoon and swoop down on a fish (we think it’s a Mullet but that is not confirmed). Oscar is at the top of the food chain in the heart of Malibu’s eco-system. (Click on the image to the left to see the slideshow. Then, click on your back button to return to this page and see another slideshow. Hover your mouse/cursor over the picture to pause the slideshow)
Native plants are thriving, lush and green – Photos taken 2/20/14 Over 70,000 native plants were planted and are maturing due to careful maintenence. A temporary irrigation system keeps them fed with water while their roots take hold. It is expected that the plants will take another year to fully mature and the roots to strongly take hold. In the mean time, water rationing has been imposed due to the drought conditions California is currently experiencing. (Click on the image to the left to see the slideshow. Then, click on your back button to return to this page and see another slideshow)
The Artificial Berm in front of the Adamson House This slide show is a series of images and text that explain the reasons why Beaches and Harbors and State Parks constructed the artificial sand berm to prevent the Lagoon channel from meandering too close to the Adamson house and lifeguard towers. (Click on the image to the left to see the slideshow. Then, click on your back button to return to this page and see another slideshow)
A Day at Malibu Lagoon These images were photographed on November 13, 2013. Birds continue to flock to the newly restored Malibu Lagoon. We are seeing a great variety of birds, from Great Egrets, to Common Mergansers. Birds are feeding throughout the entire Lagoon all the way to the back of the channels, which used to be the dead-zone where birds would rarely visit. (Click on the image to the left to see the slideshow. Then, click on your back button to return to this page and see another slideshow)
More Birds Gather in the lagoon These images were photographed on November 4, 2013. Birds appear to really like the newly restored Malibu Lagoon. We are seeing a great variety of birds, from Great Egrets, Mallard Ducks, to Coots, Pelicans, Grebes, Herons and many other birds enjoying the Lagoon. Birds are using the entire Lagoon all the way to the back of the channels, which used to be the dead-zone where birds would rarely visit. (Click on the image to the left to see the slideshow. Then, click on your back button to return to this page and see another slideshow)
Aireals of The lagoon restoration over time In a series of aireal photos, captured monthly starting in June 2012, the progress of the restoration is seen from beginning to end. (Click on the image to the left to see the slideshow. Then, click on your back button to return to this page and see another slideshow)
Pipes, trash, debris and muck This slide show documents the trash, debris, fill dirt, and hidden pipes that were discovered and removed during the Malibu Lagoon Restoration project which took place between June 04, 2012 and March 31st 2013. Malibu Lagoon was used as a disposal site by the Department of Transportation which later became known as Cal Trans between the 1920’s and 1960’s. (Click the image to view the slideshow).
May 3, 2013, Grand Opening More than 250 people attended the celebration. (Click on the image to the left to see the slideshow. Then, click on your back button to return to this page and see another slideshow)
Birds flock in the lagoon These images were photographed on October 21, 2013 over the course of 3 hours. Birds appear to really like the newly restored Malibu Lagoon. We are seeing a great variety of birds, from Ospreys, Brant geese, Coots to ducks, Pelicans, Grebes, Great Blue Herons, Egrets, and many other birds enjoying the Lagoon. Birds are using the entire Lagoon all the way to the back of the channels, which used to be a dead-zone that birds would rarely visit. 

Board of Directors